Let the collector's motto be, "Trust nothing to the memory;" for the memory becomes a fickle guardian when one interesting object is succeeded by another still more interesting. Charles Darwin

What is Darwin Inspired?

Seeking out experiences that raise questions which provoke enquiry about the world around us.

Our director says "I have had a life long passion for Darwin and to be able to conceptualise and develop Darwin Inspired Learning over the years (and into the future) is the best job I could imagine."

But what's your view? How has Darwin Inspired you?


What we do

Video PlayerWe take Darwin's life story and help students and teachers see and learn through their own experience of the world.

We publish books and other resources to enable this learning, including the newly-published DARWIN-INSPIRED LEARNING - click here for flyer and order form.

This interesting book imaginatively connects Charles Darwin the scientist with new approaches to science education.  It shows what can be learnt from Darwin about doing science – his outstanding experimental skills, his ability to observe the natural world acutely, and his ability to synthesise information and produce general laws.  The book connects these ways of doing science with teaching today, placing particular emphasis on studying the roles that the outdoor living world and natural history can play.  Exposing pupils to this thinking and encouraging them to ‘read’ nature and by doing so to participate in real science, provides new and exciting dimensions to the teaching of science in schools.  This unusual book sets out an important agenda, making use of the natural living world in ways inspired by Darwin’s genius, to stimulate science education at all stages of a young person’s school experience.

Professor Paul Nurse
President of the Royal Society


More about what we do

Resources for teachers

Lesson plans







PDFs of teaching modules

Exploring Darwin Inspired teaching and learning

Supporting Darwin Inspired teaching and learning

Images for use in the classroom


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